THE WHITE CITY OF TEL AVIV TEL AVIV'S MODERN MOVEMENT
(12.2.2014 - 30.3.2014)



The international exhibition of spring 2014 at the Museum of Finnish Architecture, The White City of Tel Aviv – Tel Aviv's Modern Movement, dives into the early stages of modernism, introducing one of the most significant entities of Bauhaus architecture.
 
The exhibition that has been displayed around the world introduces Tel Aviv’s White City, recognized by UNESCO as a World Heritage Site in 2003. Built in the 1930s – 1950s, the White City consists of over 4,000 buildings and its scale presents a unique example of a uniform Bauhaus area.
 
Local architects studied in the avant-garde schools of Eastern, Central and Western Europe and received additional training from leading European architects such as Erich Mendelsohn,
Le Corbusier and Hannes Meyer. The architects brought their knowledge and experience to Tel Aviv, creating a new architectural language adapted to the local climate in a blend of various European influences.
 
Today, these buildings are undergoing a “facelift”. Some will grow in height with the addition of new storeys adapted to the existing structure. All modifications will adhere to clear conservation guidelines in order to preserve the White City’s character for generations to come.
 
The exhibition was first shown in Tel Aviv’s Art Museum in 2004 as part of celebrations following UNESCO’s recognition of the White City of Tel Aviv as a World Heritage Site in 2003. Since then, the exhibition has been displayed around the world. In Finland the exhibition is organized by the Museum of Finnish Architecture with support from the City of Tel Aviv and the Embassy of Israel.


Esther Cinema (former: Dizengoff-Cinema), Zina Dizengoff Circle / 1 Zamenhof Street (1939)
Architects: Yehuda & Raphael Magidovitch
© Nitza Metzger-Szmuk, Dwelling on the dunes
Lustig & Rosenthal House (1936), 3 Ben Ami Street
Architect: Mordechai Rosengarten
© Nitza Metzger-Szmuk, Dwelling on the dunes

Bruno House, 3 Strauss Street (1935)
Architect: Ze’ev Haller
© Nitza Metzger-Szmuk, Dwelling on the dunes
Dizengoff Square (1935)
Architect: Genia Averbouch
© Nitza Metzger-Szmuk, Dwelling on the dunes
Dizengoff Square (1935)
Architect: Genia Averbouch
© Nitza Metzger-Szmuk, Dwelling on the dunes
Engel House (1934), 84 Rothschild Boulevard / Mazeh Street
Architect: Ze’ev Rechter
© Nitza Metzger-Szmuk, Dwelling on the dunes
Leon Recanati House (1935), 35 Menahem Begin Road / 79 Mazeh Street
Architects: Salomon Liaskowsky & Jacov Ornstein
© Nitza Metzger-Szmuk, Dwelling on the dunes